James the Permaculture Traveler

An Australian globetrotter, in this exclusive interview James opens up about his adventures traveling the world and his experiences living in a permaculture community. He unfolds the reasons behind what what brought him to Bali when we met him, when his interests in permaculture began and why, and his view on the future of the environment.

Why become a permaculture traveler?

While hitchhiking in Australia, James learns the story of an individual who had it all but was completely and utterly unhappy. He describes this as “bullshit, its just an allusion your trapped in… you can just step outside of it.”  With his blunt remarks and down to earth character, James has no problem sharing his honest opinion. And this, PRCPTION Travelers, is the attitude of a permaculture traveler.

James communicates to us that its been a dream of his to travel to this tropical paradise, Bali, and what brought him on this new adventure. Not only is there less regulations and more freedom, but  one can learn so much about the ancient knowledge of sustainability in Asia.

What is permaculture, anyway?

Permaculture is a system of agricultural and social design principles centered around simulating or directly utilizing the patterns and features observed in natural ecosystems. As confusing as that may seem, to James its not only his passion but comes as second nature to him.

“It all comes down to reconnecting with the earth, using your hands, making observations and living on the land.”

It all started in 2009 when he traveled to India and attended a meditation retreat. He illustrates the picture of being completely blown away culturally and absolutely shocked by the awareness he gained of the manufactured goods being used overseas without regulation, and worst of all without human rights. Wanting to generate change, James then moved to a vegan community in a forest located in South India. Here life was simple, trees where planted, water was conserved and there was community. James the permaculture traveler describes this time in his life when he became very interested in this lifestyle and living within a community, when he returned to Aussie, things where different. He felt lost in a world full of consumerism and excess, a world where all the problems and trash are there but only covered up and ignored.

Modern day society and growing out of it

The Australian, 1st world mentality for young adults graduating high school is taking a gap year and “finding yourself and what you want to do for the rest of your life.” However, James disagrees with this, he states that first of all, kids don’t even know whats going on in the world and when they go to Bali–they just drink there nights away and are not aware of the culture that surrounds them. From there on out, it’s expected of them to go to university for a big time degree in order to get a big time career and then when you have a career its only to make money to support a a family or settle down, similar to the American Dream. With the spread of technology, no one has the right to be ignorant about whats really happening in the world.

“This mainstream society just isn’t working.”

Candidly, James expresses his views on a not so bright future. However he encourages us to keep smiling, keep loving,  keep our heads up and stay positive. This earth has been heavily damaged by humans and James believes the only solution is to accept that we have a difficult future ahead of us and inspire others. If only people would stop and take a break from there 9-5 work life, massive houses and put down their smartphones and come to a place like Bali. Here they could learn traditional farming, how to live off the land, and really learn just how important community is, this will generate change and save us from living in a time where theres so much uncertainty about the future.

Learn more about where James learned his ways of permaculture traveler at www.permaculture.au and remember: you too can do exactly what he has done with his life. It may not be easy and comfortable at all times, but it sure is fulfilling.